Commit 694b1857 authored by Kurt Zeilenga's avatar Kurt Zeilenga
Browse files

Misc updates

parent c07c2667
......@@ -17,12 +17,13 @@ Copyright 1992-1996, University of Michigan, All Rights Reserved.
# acknowledge U-M. Probably should be placed in a separate file.
P2[notoc] Acknowledgements
The OpenLDAP Project is comprised of a team of volunteers. This
software would not be possible without their contribution of
time and energy.
The OpenLDAP Project ({{URL:http://www.openldap.org/}}) is comprised
of a team of volunteers. This software would not be possible
without their contribution of time and energy.
The OpenLDAP Project would also like to thank the {{University of Michigan
LDAP Team}} for building the foundation of LDAP software and information
LDAP Team}} ({{URL::http://www.umich.edu/~dirsvcs/ldap/}}) for building
the foundation of LDAP software and information
to which we build upon.
......@@ -23,34 +23,34 @@ you can retrieve using this URL:
.Pick a place for the LDAP source to live, cd
there, and untar it. For example:
.{{EX:cd /usr/local/src}}
.{{EX:gunzip -c openldap-release.tgz | tar xvfB -}}
.{{EX:cd ldap}}
..{{EX:cd /usr/local/src}}
..{{EX:gunzip -c openldap-release.tgz | tar xvfB -}}
..{{EX:cd ldap}}
+ {{B: Configure the software}}.
. You will need to run the configure script to configure slapd.
.{{EX:./configure}}
..{{EX:./configure}}
. Configure accepts many command line options that enable or disable
optional features in slapd. Usually the defaults are okay, but you
may want to change them. To get a complete list of options that configure
accepts, use the --help option.
.{{EX:./configure --help}}
..{{EX:./configure --help}}
. Once OpenLDAP has been configured, it needs to be compiled.
You'll need to make dependencies and then compile the software.
For example:
.{{EX:make depend}}
.{{EX:make}}
..{{EX:make depend}}
..{{EX:make}}
. Once OpenLDAP is compiled you need to install it. By default OpenLDAP
is installed into /usr/local. This is typically done as root.
.{{EX:su root}}
.{{EX:make install}}
..{{EX:su root}}
..{{EX:make install}}
+ {{B:Edit the configuration file}}.
. Use this section as a brief guide. For more details on the configuration
......@@ -63,32 +63,32 @@ option when you ran configure, then replace {{FILE:/usr/local}} with the
value you gave as the prefix.
. For example, if you ran configure as
.{{EX:./configure --prefix=/opt/ldap}}
..{{EX:./configure --prefix=/opt/ldap}}
. You would find your configuration file in {{FILE:/opt/ldap/etc/openldap/slapd.conf}}.
. Now look in the configuration file for a line that begins with
.{{EX:database ldbm}}
..{{EX:database ldbm}}
. This marks the begining of the database configuration for slapd. Everything
you will need to change for this example is located after the line begining with
.{{EX:database ldbm}}
..{{EX:database ldbm}}
. Listed below are the default settings for the database in {{FILE:slapd.conf}}.
Lines that begin with a # are considered to be comments by slapd, they have
been removed from the listing below to save space.
.{{EX:suffix "dc=my-domain, dc=com"}}
.{{EX:rootdn "cn=Manager, dc=my-domain, dc=com"}}
.{{EX:rootpw secret}}
.{{EX:directory /usr/local/var/openldap-ldbm}}
..{{EX:suffix "dc=my-domain, dc=com"}}
..{{EX:rootdn "cn=Manager, dc=my-domain, dc=com"}}
..{{EX:rootpw secret}}
..{{EX:directory /usr/local/var/openldap-ldbm}}
. Now we need to replace all of the references to my-domain with the correct
value. For example, if your domain is example.net we might use the following.
.{{EX:suffix "dc=example, dc=net"}}
.{{EX:rootdn "cn=Manager, dc=example, dc=net"}}
.{{EX:rootpw secret}}
.{{EX:directory /usr/local/var/openldap-ldbm}}
..{{EX:suffix "dc=example, dc=net"}}
..{{EX:rootdn "cn=Manager, dc=example, dc=net"}}
..{{EX:rootpw secret}}
..{{EX:directory /usr/local/var/openldap-ldbm}}
+ {{B:Create a database}}.
. This is a two-step process. Step A is to create
......@@ -96,16 +96,16 @@ a file (we'll call it myldif) containing the entries you want your database
to contain. Use the following example as a guide, or see Section 7.3 for
more details.
.{{EX:dn: dc=example, dc=net}}
.{{EX:objectclass: dcObject}}
.{{EX:objectclass: organization}}
.{{EX:o: Example Net Inc.}}
.{{EX:dc: example}}
.
.{{EX:dn: cn=Bob Smith, dc=example, dc=net}}
.{{EX:objectclass: person}}
.{{EX:cn: Bob Smith}}
.{{EX:sn: Smith}}
..{{EX:dn: dc=example, dc=net}}
..{{EX:objectclass: dcObject}}
..{{EX:objectclass: organization}}
..{{EX:o: Example Net Inc.}}
..{{EX:dc: example}}
..
..{{EX:dn: cn=Bob Smith, dc=example, dc=net}}
..{{EX:objectclass: person}}
..{{EX:cn: Bob Smith}}
..{{EX:sn: Smith}}
.Remember to replace dc=example,dc=net with the correct values for your
site, and to put your name instead of Bob's.
......@@ -117,7 +117,7 @@ or add them later via LDAP.
.First we'll need to start slapd.
To do this just run slapd.
.{{EX:/usr/local/libexec/slapd}}
..{{EX:/usr/local/libexec/slapd}}
.At this point the LDAP server is up and running, but there isn't any data
in the directory.
......@@ -126,18 +126,18 @@ You can check to see if the server is running and your naming context
{{I:ldapsearch}}(1).
By default ldapsearch is installed as {{FILE:/usr/local/bin/ldapsearch}}.
.{{EX:ldapsearch -x -b "" -s base '(objectclass=*)' namingContexts}}
..{{EX:ldapsearch -x -b "" -s base '(objectclass=*)' namingContexts}}
This should return:
.{{EX:dn:}}
.{{EX:namingContexts: dc=example, dc=net}}
..{{EX:dn:}}
..{{EX:namingContexts: dc=example, dc=net}}
.We can use {{I:ldapadd}}(1) to populate the directory.
Again remember to replace dc=example,dc=net with the correct values for your
site. By default ldapadd is installed as {{FILE:/usr/local/bin/ldapadd}}.
.{{EX:ldapadd -x -D"cn=Manager,dc=example,dc=net" -w secret -f myldif}}
..{{EX:ldapadd -x -D"cn=Manager,dc=example,dc=net" -w secret -f myldif}}
.Where myldif is the file you made in step 7A above. By default, the database
files will be created in {{FILE:/usr/local/var/openldap-ldbm}}.
......@@ -151,13 +151,13 @@ You may specify an alternate directory via the directory option in the
example uses the ldapsearch tool. Remember to replace dc=example,dc=net with
the correct values for your site.
.{{EX:ldapsearch -x -b 'dc=example,dc=net' '(objectclass=*)'}}
..{{EX:ldapsearch -x -b 'dc=example,dc=net' '(objectclass=*)'}}
. This command will search for and retrieve every entry in the database.
Note the use of single quotes around the filter, which prevents the "*"
from being interpreted by the shell.
. You are now ready to add more entries (e.g., using {{I:ldapadd}}(1) or
You are now ready to add more entries (e.g., using {{I:ldapadd}}(1) or
another LDAP client), experiment with various configuration options,
backend arrangements, etc. Note that by default, the {{I:slapd}} database
grants {{EX:READ}} access to everybody. So if you want to add or modify
......
......@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@ other parties and their use subject to additional restrictions.
This work is derived from the University of Michigan LDAP v3.3
distribution. Information concerning is available at:
.{{URL:http://www.umich.edu/~dirsvcs/ldap/ldap.html}}.
.{{URL:http://www.umich.edu/~dirsvcs/ldap/ldap/}}.
This work also contains materials derived from public sources.
......
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